Calendar

Sep 23 all-day Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
The mapping of broad climate zones, wind direction, ocean currents, and related weather events has a long and storied history. In this exhibition, visitors will discover how “Venti” were wind personas who directed ancient ships and “Horae” were goddesses of the seasons who dictated natural order during the 15th-17th centuries, how Enlightenment scientists started to collect and map weather data, and how 19th century geographers reflecting the golden age of thematic cartography created innovative techniques to represent vast amounts of statistical data and developed complex maps furthering our understanding of climatic regions. As visitors explore five centuries of regions and seasons, they can compare this gradual sophistication of mapping climatic data, with the modern use of computers and models to further analyze the impact of changing climatic conditions on future generations.
Sep 23 all-day Northwest Corridor in front of the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
Recent immigration has given Boston a new richness of ethnic, language and cultural diversity, with more countries than ever before represented among us. Boston’s foreign-born population, hailing from more than 130 countries, now accounts for 28% of the city’s total population, and the neighborhoods that make up Boston often tell unique stories of diversity and change. This exhibition compares the landscape of today’s “new” Boston with that of over 100 years ago. The maps and graphics on display here show where Boston’s foreign-born residents originate from, and where newer immigrant groups have settled, while celebrating who we are, and the vibrant diversity that is Boston.
Sep 24 all-day Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
The mapping of broad climate zones, wind direction, ocean currents, and related weather events has a long and storied history. In this exhibition, visitors will discover how “Venti” were wind personas who directed ancient ships and “Horae” were goddesses of the seasons who dictated natural order during the 15th-17th centuries, how Enlightenment scientists started to collect and map weather data, and how 19th century geographers reflecting the golden age of thematic cartography created innovative techniques to represent vast amounts of statistical data and developed complex maps furthering our understanding of climatic regions. As visitors explore five centuries of regions and seasons, they can compare this gradual sophistication of mapping climatic data, with the modern use of computers and models to further analyze the impact of changing climatic conditions on future generations.
Sep 24 all-day Northwest Corridor in front of the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
Recent immigration has given Boston a new richness of ethnic, language and cultural diversity, with more countries than ever before represented among us. Boston’s foreign-born population, hailing from more than 130 countries, now accounts for 28% of the city’s total population, and the neighborhoods that make up Boston often tell unique stories of diversity and change. This exhibition compares the landscape of today’s “new” Boston with that of over 100 years ago. The maps and graphics on display here show where Boston’s foreign-born residents originate from, and where newer immigrant groups have settled, while celebrating who we are, and the vibrant diversity that is Boston.
Sep 25 – Sep 29 all-day
The Map Center Gallery and Learning Center are closed for installation of a new exhibition.
Sep 25 all-day Northwest Corridor in front of the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
Recent immigration has given Boston a new richness of ethnic, language and cultural diversity, with more countries than ever before represented among us. Boston’s foreign-born population, hailing from more than 130 countries, now accounts for 28% of the city’s total population, and the neighborhoods that make up Boston often tell unique stories of diversity and change. This exhibition compares the landscape of today’s “new” Boston with that of over 100 years ago. The maps and graphics on display here show where Boston’s foreign-born residents originate from, and where newer immigrant groups have settled, while celebrating who we are, and the vibrant diversity that is Boston.
Sep 26 all-day Northwest Corridor in front of the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
Recent immigration has given Boston a new richness of ethnic, language and cultural diversity, with more countries than ever before represented among us. Boston’s foreign-born population, hailing from more than 130 countries, now accounts for 28% of the city’s total population, and the neighborhoods that make up Boston often tell unique stories of diversity and change. This exhibition compares the landscape of today’s “new” Boston with that of over 100 years ago. The maps and graphics on display here show where Boston’s foreign-born residents originate from, and where newer immigrant groups have settled, while celebrating who we are, and the vibrant diversity that is Boston.
Sep 27 all-day Northwest Corridor in front of the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
Recent immigration has given Boston a new richness of ethnic, language and cultural diversity, with more countries than ever before represented among us. Boston’s foreign-born population, hailing from more than 130 countries, now accounts for 28% of the city’s total population, and the neighborhoods that make up Boston often tell unique stories of diversity and change. This exhibition compares the landscape of today’s “new” Boston with that of over 100 years ago. The maps and graphics on display here show where Boston’s foreign-born residents originate from, and where newer immigrant groups have settled, while celebrating who we are, and the vibrant diversity that is Boston.
Sep 28 all-day Northwest Corridor in front of the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
Recent immigration has given Boston a new richness of ethnic, language and cultural diversity, with more countries than ever before represented among us. Boston’s foreign-born population, hailing from more than 130 countries, now accounts for 28% of the city’s total population, and the neighborhoods that make up Boston often tell unique stories of diversity and change. This exhibition compares the landscape of today’s “new” Boston with that of over 100 years ago. The maps and graphics on display here show where Boston’s foreign-born residents originate from, and where newer immigrant groups have settled, while celebrating who we are, and the vibrant diversity that is Boston.
Sep 29 all-day Northwest Corridor in front of the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
Recent immigration has given Boston a new richness of ethnic, language and cultural diversity, with more countries than ever before represented among us. Boston’s foreign-born population, hailing from more than 130 countries, now accounts for 28% of the city’s total population, and the neighborhoods that make up Boston often tell unique stories of diversity and change. This exhibition compares the landscape of today’s “new” Boston with that of over 100 years ago. The maps and graphics on display here show where Boston’s foreign-born residents originate from, and where newer immigrant groups have settled, while celebrating who we are, and the vibrant diversity that is Boston.
Sep 30 all-day Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
Humans have been delving below Earth’s surface for tens of thousands of years.  From the earliest maps of the spiritual underworld made by ancient man, to digital maps of the seabed produced today, the human need to explore and envision the world beneath our feet is age-old.  In this exhibition, you will see how ancient Romans carved vast underground catacombs, how minerals and natural resources have been studied, engineered and transported since the 19th century, how today’s scientific and cartographic advancements have enabled us to picture the entire ocean floor, and what lies below the streets of Boston.  As you explore nearly 400 years of maps and images of the world below, you can compare the historical viewpoint with the modern, and see how we have advanced our perception and depiction of what lies beneath.
Sep 30 all-day Northwest Corridor in front of the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
Recent immigration has given Boston a new richness of ethnic, language and cultural diversity, with more countries than ever before represented among us. Boston’s foreign-born population, hailing from more than 130 countries, now accounts for 28% of the city’s total population, and the neighborhoods that make up Boston often tell unique stories of diversity and change. This exhibition compares the landscape of today’s “new” Boston with that of over 100 years ago. The maps and graphics on display here show where Boston’s foreign-born residents originate from, and where newer immigrant groups have settled, while celebrating who we are, and the vibrant diversity that is Boston.
Sep 30 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm Children's Library, Boston Public Library
Welcome the start of a new school year and learn about Chinese culture in Boston with a thrilling story time in the Children’s Library, featuring a read-aloud, craft, and lion dance performed by a member of theBoston Chinese Freemasons Athletic Club. Presented in partnership with the  BPL Children’s Library.
Oct 1 all-day Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
Humans have been delving below Earth’s surface for tens of thousands of years.  From the earliest maps of the spiritual underworld made by ancient man, to digital maps of the seabed produced today, the human need to explore and envision the world beneath our feet is age-old.  In this exhibition, you will see how ancient Romans carved vast underground catacombs, how minerals and natural resources have been studied, engineered and transported since the 19th century, how today’s scientific and cartographic advancements have enabled us to picture the entire ocean floor, and what lies below the streets of Boston.  As you explore nearly 400 years of maps and images of the world below, you can compare the historical viewpoint with the modern, and see how we have advanced our perception and depiction of what lies beneath.
Oct 1 all-day Northwest Corridor in front of the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
Recent immigration has given Boston a new richness of ethnic, language and cultural diversity, with more countries than ever before represented among us. Boston’s foreign-born population, hailing from more than 130 countries, now accounts for 28% of the city’s total population, and the neighborhoods that make up Boston often tell unique stories of diversity and change. This exhibition compares the landscape of today’s “new” Boston with that of over 100 years ago. The maps and graphics on display here show where Boston’s foreign-born residents originate from, and where newer immigrant groups have settled, while celebrating who we are, and the vibrant diversity that is Boston.
Oct 2 all-day Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
Humans have been delving below Earth’s surface for tens of thousands of years.  From the earliest maps of the spiritual underworld made by ancient man, to digital maps of the seabed produced today, the human need to explore and envision the world beneath our feet is age-old.  In this exhibition, you will see how ancient Romans carved vast underground catacombs, how minerals and natural resources have been studied, engineered and transported since the 19th century, how today’s scientific and cartographic advancements have enabled us to picture the entire ocean floor, and what lies below the streets of Boston.  As you explore nearly 400 years of maps and images of the world below, you can compare the historical viewpoint with the modern, and see how we have advanced our perception and depiction of what lies beneath.
Oct 2 all-day Northwest Corridor in front of the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
Recent immigration has given Boston a new richness of ethnic, language and cultural diversity, with more countries than ever before represented among us. Boston’s foreign-born population, hailing from more than 130 countries, now accounts for 28% of the city’s total population, and the neighborhoods that make up Boston often tell unique stories of diversity and change. This exhibition compares the landscape of today’s “new” Boston with that of over 100 years ago. The maps and graphics on display here show where Boston’s foreign-born residents originate from, and where newer immigrant groups have settled, while celebrating who we are, and the vibrant diversity that is Boston.
Oct 3 all-day Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
Humans have been delving below Earth’s surface for tens of thousands of years.  From the earliest maps of the spiritual underworld made by ancient man, to digital maps of the seabed produced today, the human need to explore and envision the world beneath our feet is age-old.  In this exhibition, you will see how ancient Romans carved vast underground catacombs, how minerals and natural resources have been studied, engineered and transported since the 19th century, how today’s scientific and cartographic advancements have enabled us to picture the entire ocean floor, and what lies below the streets of Boston.  As you explore nearly 400 years of maps and images of the world below, you can compare the historical viewpoint with the modern, and see how we have advanced our perception and depiction of what lies beneath.
Oct 3 all-day Northwest Corridor in front of the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
Recent immigration has given Boston a new richness of ethnic, language and cultural diversity, with more countries than ever before represented among us. Boston’s foreign-born population, hailing from more than 130 countries, now accounts for 28% of the city’s total population, and the neighborhoods that make up Boston often tell unique stories of diversity and change. This exhibition compares the landscape of today’s “new” Boston with that of over 100 years ago. The maps and graphics on display here show where Boston’s foreign-born residents originate from, and where newer immigrant groups have settled, while celebrating who we are, and the vibrant diversity that is Boston.
Oct 4 all-day Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
Humans have been delving below Earth’s surface for tens of thousands of years.  From the earliest maps of the spiritual underworld made by ancient man, to digital maps of the seabed produced today, the human need to explore and envision the world beneath our feet is age-old.  In this exhibition, you will see how ancient Romans carved vast underground catacombs, how minerals and natural resources have been studied, engineered and transported since the 19th century, how today’s scientific and cartographic advancements have enabled us to picture the entire ocean floor, and what lies below the streets of Boston.  As you explore nearly 400 years of maps and images of the world below, you can compare the historical viewpoint with the modern, and see how we have advanced our perception and depiction of what lies beneath.
Oct 4 all-day Northwest Corridor in front of the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
Recent immigration has given Boston a new richness of ethnic, language and cultural diversity, with more countries than ever before represented among us. Boston’s foreign-born population, hailing from more than 130 countries, now accounts for 28% of the city’s total population, and the neighborhoods that make up Boston often tell unique stories of diversity and change. This exhibition compares the landscape of today’s “new” Boston with that of over 100 years ago. The maps and graphics on display here show where Boston’s foreign-born residents originate from, and where newer immigrant groups have settled, while celebrating who we are, and the vibrant diversity that is Boston.
Oct 4 @ 12:30 pm – 1:00 pm Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
Discover the amazing collections of the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center. Tour the current exhibition, Regions and Seasons: Mapping Climate through History, and also discover historic maps of Boston and the world from 1482 to the present. Tour meets outside the Map Center doors and lasts approximately 30 minutes. Children welcome at parent’s discretion.   *Map Center tours are offered on the first Wednesday and third Friday of every month
Oct 5 all-day Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
Humans have been delving below Earth’s surface for tens of thousands of years.  From the earliest maps of the spiritual underworld made by ancient man, to digital maps of the seabed produced today, the human need to explore and envision the world beneath our feet is age-old.  In this exhibition, you will see how ancient Romans carved vast underground catacombs, how minerals and natural resources have been studied, engineered and transported since the 19th century, how today’s scientific and cartographic advancements have enabled us to picture the entire ocean floor, and what lies below the streets of Boston.  As you explore nearly 400 years of maps and images of the world below, you can compare the historical viewpoint with the modern, and see how we have advanced our perception and depiction of what lies beneath.
Oct 5 all-day Northwest Corridor in front of the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
Recent immigration has given Boston a new richness of ethnic, language and cultural diversity, with more countries than ever before represented among us. Boston’s foreign-born population, hailing from more than 130 countries, now accounts for 28% of the city’s total population, and the neighborhoods that make up Boston often tell unique stories of diversity and change. This exhibition compares the landscape of today’s “new” Boston with that of over 100 years ago. The maps and graphics on display here show where Boston’s foreign-born residents originate from, and where newer immigrant groups have settled, while celebrating who we are, and the vibrant diversity that is Boston.
Oct 5 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm Commonwealth Salon, Boston Public Library, Copley Square
Join us as Westy Egmont and Alvaro Lima unpack the stories behind the maps in the Leventhal Map Center’s exhibition, Who We Are: Boston Immigration Then and Now. Alvaro will examine how transnationalism pushes the boundaries of traditional nation-state rules for citizenship, political rights, and migration, and Westy will discuss how diversity can foster a pluralistic world view and secure communities. After the talk, audience members will be invited to reexamine Who We Are. Please note that this event will take place in the Commonwealth Salon across the hall from the Leventhal Map Center gallery. The gallery will remain open for additional viewing until 8:00 pm.
Oct 6 all-day Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
Humans have been delving below Earth’s surface for tens of thousands of years.  From the earliest maps of the spiritual underworld made by ancient man, to digital maps of the seabed produced today, the human need to explore and envision the world beneath our feet is age-old.  In this exhibition, you will see how ancient Romans carved vast underground catacombs, how minerals and natural resources have been studied, engineered and transported since the 19th century, how today’s scientific and cartographic advancements have enabled us to picture the entire ocean floor, and what lies below the streets of Boston.  As you explore nearly 400 years of maps and images of the world below, you can compare the historical viewpoint with the modern, and see how we have advanced our perception and depiction of what lies beneath.
Oct 6 all-day Northwest Corridor in front of the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
Recent immigration has given Boston a new richness of ethnic, language and cultural diversity, with more countries than ever before represented among us. Boston’s foreign-born population, hailing from more than 130 countries, now accounts for 28% of the city’s total population, and the neighborhoods that make up Boston often tell unique stories of diversity and change. This exhibition compares the landscape of today’s “new” Boston with that of over 100 years ago. The maps and graphics on display here show where Boston’s foreign-born residents originate from, and where newer immigrant groups have settled, while celebrating who we are, and the vibrant diversity that is Boston.
Oct 7 all-day Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
Humans have been delving below Earth’s surface for tens of thousands of years.  From the earliest maps of the spiritual underworld made by ancient man, to digital maps of the seabed produced today, the human need to explore and envision the world beneath our feet is age-old.  In this exhibition, you will see how ancient Romans carved vast underground catacombs, how minerals and natural resources have been studied, engineered and transported since the 19th century, how today’s scientific and cartographic advancements have enabled us to picture the entire ocean floor, and what lies below the streets of Boston.  As you explore nearly 400 years of maps and images of the world below, you can compare the historical viewpoint with the modern, and see how we have advanced our perception and depiction of what lies beneath.
Oct 7 all-day Northwest Corridor in front of the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
Recent immigration has given Boston a new richness of ethnic, language and cultural diversity, with more countries than ever before represented among us. Boston’s foreign-born population, hailing from more than 130 countries, now accounts for 28% of the city’s total population, and the neighborhoods that make up Boston often tell unique stories of diversity and change. This exhibition compares the landscape of today’s “new” Boston with that of over 100 years ago. The maps and graphics on display here show where Boston’s foreign-born residents originate from, and where newer immigrant groups have settled, while celebrating who we are, and the vibrant diversity that is Boston.
Oct 8 all-day Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
Humans have been delving below Earth’s surface for tens of thousands of years.  From the earliest maps of the spiritual underworld made by ancient man, to digital maps of the seabed produced today, the human need to explore and envision the world beneath our feet is age-old.  In this exhibition, you will see how ancient Romans carved vast underground catacombs, how minerals and natural resources have been studied, engineered and transported since the 19th century, how today’s scientific and cartographic advancements have enabled us to picture the entire ocean floor, and what lies below the streets of Boston.  As you explore nearly 400 years of maps and images of the world below, you can compare the historical viewpoint with the modern, and see how we have advanced our perception and depiction of what lies beneath.